10 colourful global wedding traditions

Posted on May 9, 2012 by The Diamond Ring Company There have been 0 comments

The world is full of different cultures and religions, and the difference from even one region to another in some countries is dramatic. Despite this, Weddings seem to be a universal affair. Here we look at some of the more unusual wedding traditions across the globe.


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Greek Wedding Traditions

In Greece the wedding is a big excuse for a party! ItÔÇÖs great that they have such a positive view of marriage, and they make the most of the occasion. The most famous of their traditions of course is the smashing of plates for good luck, but they are also known for throwing money at the musicians and partying right through the night!


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Korean Wedding traditions

In Korea the importance of good fortune is high. So much so that a fortune teller, or Kung-hap, is required to delve into the future of the newly weds to be. It is important for Koreans to know that the wedding is likely to be harmonious. A large reason for this is that engagement presents tend to be lavish, with $40,000 not an unusual amount of money to be spent on a gift!


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Indian Wedding traditions

India, and indeed any country with a Hindu culture have some very strong traditions that have to be observed. In India it is not uncommon for newly weds to be not to see each other for several days before the ceremony, and on the day itself, the parents of the bride wash their daughterÔÇÖs feet with milk and water in order to purify her for her journey ahead.


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Vietnamese Wedding Traditions

In Vietnam they certainly do things differently in comparison to our western ideas. On the morning of the wedding, the groomÔÇÖs mother brings two gifts for the happy couple. The first is an indigenous plant, and the second is a pink piece of chalk, to represent happiness.


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Pakistani Wedding Celebrations

In Pakistan, wedding celebrations can be drawn out in comparison to what we might be used to in Britain. The wedding is celebrated for a full four days, with the couple not seeing each other during the first two days. The third day marks the actual ceremony, where both the bride and groom wear red. Unusually, the wedding celebrations follow on the next day, with the newly wed couple marking the occasion by hosting dinner as husband and wife.


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Thai Wedding Celebrations

In Thailand it is not as simple as just getting married - Couples who wish to wed have to prepare food for the monks! In return the monks will give their holy blessing to the marriage.

An important part of Thai marriage is the process of the couple sitting on the floor with their hands pressed together and with their fingers pointing under their chins. At this point, their eldest relative leads the wedding ceremony in wishing them luck, but dipping the coupleÔÇÖs hands in a conch shell with water in it.


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Chinese Wedding Celebrations

The Chinese are certainly a race that puts as lot of faith in astrology. Wedding anniversaries tend to be chosen very carefully in order to tie in with astrological signs, and couples are also married on the half hour mark rather than on the stroke of the hour. This is so that the couple start their marriage on a positive note, with the hands of the clock pointing up, rather than down.

The morning of the wedding sees the groom symbolically dressed by his parents and then proceeds to his brideÔÇÖs house, to deliver gifts of cash for his brideÔÇÖs friends, in order that they ÔÇÿlet her goÔÇÖ. ItÔÇÖs also not unusual for there to be a nine or even ten course meal after the wedding!

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Armenian Wedding Celebrations

The Armenian ceremony reaches its peak with the crowning of the bridge and groom and then the best man holds a cross over their heads. During the wedding reception, the Bride can look forward to coins being thrown at her as part of the ritual! It is also tradition for red and green ribbons to the guests clothing and toasts are then made to the couple. Lots of dancing typically ends the evening celebrations.


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Middle Eastern Wedding Celebrations

In the middle east, the wedding is very important. In many areas of the Middle East, it is not uncommon for there to be as many as five parties thrown in honour of the wedding. This includes the engagement party, a party for when the bride and groom sign the marriage documents, the third party is thrown the day before the wedding. This is the Hena party, and it is the second largest of the celebrations. The bride has special Hena tattooÔÇÖs made on her hands and feet to ward off evil spirits. The fourth party is of course on the wedding day itself, and this is much like a typical western wedding reception. The final party is thrown a week later, and is called Sabaa, which means seven. it is akin to a wedding shower and is only for women to attend.


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British Wedding traditions

Here in Multicultural Britain, there are many different wedding traditions that come from all over the world. We still see with regularity the stag and hen nights that take place all over the country, and sometimes they even spill abroad! Most weddings still reflect the superstition that the bride or groom should not see each other on the night prior to the wedding, or the following morning until they meet at the church. some people continue this tradition, and some donÔÇÖt. Of course, the biggest tradition of all in Britain is the eating of the wedding cake - and there arenÔÇÖt many weddings that skip this vital stage!

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